Tagged: best practices

Best Practices for Designing a Fluent API

imageA fluent API can be incredibly helpful when sharing your application with other developers.

Fluent methods are a hot design idea and they can improve the readability of your code. However, they only make sense in specific scenarios.

A fluent interface (as first coined by Eric Evans and Martin Fowler) is a method for constructing object oriented APIs, where the readability of the source code is close to that of ordinary written prose.
A fluent interface is normally implemented by using method cascading (concretely method chaining) to relay the instruction context of a subsequent call (but a fluent interface entails more than just method chaining [1]). Generally, the context is

  • defined through the return value of a called method
  • self-referential, where the new context is equivalent to the last context
  • terminated through the return of a void context.

— From Fluent Interface

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Object JavaScript – Code Walkthrough of a jQuery UI Widget

imageIn the last post, Building Stateful jQuery UI Plugin Using Widget Factory, you were introduced to the working structure of jQuery UI Widgets. You learned that it uses the factory pattern is a way to generate different objects with a common interface. And that it Widget Factory adds features to jQuery plug-in.

jQuery UI Widget Factory is under jQuery UI, but you can use it separately for your own widgets. In this post, you will learn the steps you can take to build your own widget. This posts walks through an implementation of the filterable dropdown from Adam J. Sontag’s and Corey Frang’s post: The jQuery UI Widget Factory WAT? 

My motivation in this post is to show what goes where when you are designing your widgets. And provide some direction in the steps you can take when building a widget from scratch.

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