Tagged: User experience

Object JavaScript – Code Walkthrough of a jQuery UI Widget

imageIn the last post, Building Stateful jQuery UI Plugin Using Widget Factory, you were introduced to the working structure of jQuery UI Widgets. You learned that it uses the factory pattern is a way to generate different objects with a common interface. And that it Widget Factory adds features to jQuery plug-in.

jQuery UI Widget Factory is under jQuery UI, but you can use it separately for your own widgets. In this post, you will learn the steps you can take to build your own widget. This posts walks through an implementation of the filterable dropdown from Adam J. Sontag’s and Corey Frang’s post: The jQuery UI Widget Factory WAT? 

My motivation in this post is to show what goes where when you are designing your widgets. And provide some direction in the steps you can take when building a widget from scratch.

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Object JavaScript – Building Stateful jQuery UI Plugin Using Widget Factory

imageIn this post, you will learn step-by-step to build your own custom, reusable, testable jQuery UI widget.

You will extend the jQuery library with custom UI code and then use it on a page. The initial plug-in will be trivial to demonstrate the jQuery Widget Factory pattern. You will provide properties that you can change to change the look of your widget and you will provide some methods that will respond to user input.

In this post example, you will learn how to create a simple click counter. Click a button, increase the count. The idea is to show you the steps to create a jQuery UI Widget.

The Widget Factory system manages state, allows multiple functions to be exposed via a single plugin, and provides various extension points.

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Object JavaScript – Building a Reusable Stateless jQuery Plugin

6327_image_58FAEDFAIn this post, you will learn step-by-step to build your own custom, reusable, testable jQuery Plugin.

There are times where you will want to reuse code that performs a series of operations on a selection.

For example, you may want to embed information a span element and then have that information displayed in a references section near the end of the document. In this case, the jQuery plugin is stateless.

In the next post, Building Stateful jQuery UI Plugin Using Widget Factory, you will see how to create a stateful jQuery plugin using jQuery Widget. And you will see how the widget is a better solution for plugins that require user interaction, because the Widget factory helps you maintain state.

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Single Page App – isLoading jQuery Plugin to Indicate Content Loads

imageWhen you’re loading information using jQuery AJAX, you may want to provide visual feedback when loading data or for any action that would take time.

In this Snippet, you will learn how to:

  • Load JSON data from a getJSON call to our server.
  • Show and hide a spinning indicator inside a div.
  • Bind the incoming data to a view model object.
  • Use the view model to populate an external template.

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Then once the page is loaded, it will display the data based on an external template.

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And we’ll provide some tips on how you you can use the IsLoading library to display the loading indicator on top of the page while loading and on top of the div itself.

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Object JavaScript – External Templates Using Mustache, jQuery

mustachelogo4As you have seen in  Templates Rendering JSON Using Mustache, jQuery, you can put reusable HTML into a template and then have that template render your data. You are separating the data and providing one or more ways it can be displayed inside of a page.

This post extends what you have learned about Mustache and gives an example on how you can put your template into an external file. Once in an external file, you can use it across your site whenever you need data displayed in a particular way.

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Object JavaScript – Templates Rendering JSON Using Mustache, jQuery

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In our previous posts, you see how you can create templates and load them asynchronously using Knockout. But not everyone needs Knockout’s functionality. Maybe you just want to get some data and display it using a template.

Mustache is a library that allows you to read in JSON formatted data and display it using templates you design.

Mustache can be used for HTML, config files, source code – anything. It works by expanding tags in a template using values provided in a hash or object.

If you know JSON and a bit of JavaScript, you can implement Mustache. It is available for Ruby, JavaScript, Python, Erlang, PHP, Perl, Objective-C, Java, .NET, Android, C++, Go, Lua, ooc, ActionScript, ColdFusion, Scala, Clojure, Fantom, CoffeeScript, D, and for node.js.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to use Mustache with JavaScript to create HTML page.

Mustache is logic-less because there are no if statements, else clauses, or for loops. Instead there are only tags. Some tags are replaced with a value, some nothing, and others a series of values.

Mustache provides the same functionality to libraries like underscore.js, handlebars.js, and dust.js.

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Object JavaScript – Loading File Templates for Knockout Asynchronously Using koExternalTemplateEngine, Infuser

knockoutIn the previous post, Using Infuser to Asynchronously Load Your Templates, we took a detour into Infuser and how it can be used to call template code. But what about calling Knockout templates?

You will probably want to put a template into a separate file so you can reuse it across various pages on your site.

koExternalTemplateEngine is a JavaScript library built on top of Infuser for you to load templates asynchronously from a remote resource. It currently supports both native and jquery templates.

And you’ll see how you can use Infuser to configure your Knockout Template Engine.

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Object JavaScript – Using Infuser to Asynchronously Load Your Templates

imageIn Introduction to Templates in MVVM Using Knockout.js, Mustache, you learned how you can use templates to a display and interact with Knockoutjs. But what if you would like to reuse those templates? Would you like to be able to load the templates asynchronously? And would you like to use the same techniques to load templates that could be using in Knockout, underscore and jquery-tmpl?

Jim Cowart wrote infuser to provide a “generic-ized” utility that could interface with a given template engine and handle the fetching of templates from a remote resource.

This means you can put your template content in a folder so you can reuse it in multiple places. If your template engine expects your templates to be in SCRIPT tags, you don’t have to lose syntax highlighting, etc. in your IDE – you can still place them in their own files with a valid markup extension .

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Object JavaScript – Introduction to Templates in MVVM Using Knockout.js, Mustache

knockoutYou can use template feature in Knockoutjs to render your data. Templates are a straight forward way to build complex UI structure, often with repeating or nested blocks. You can use templates to show repeating data, such as data in tables or portfolios.

From the point of view of Object JavaScript, templates help you further separate out the code that gets and sets the data, from the code that renders the data. Templates provide you a way to reuse similar views throughout your application. And they help you isolate the view that deals with data in a way that you can find and understand in your own code.

Templates as they are used in this post, are reusable chunks of HTML that relate to your observables in Knockout.

There are two main ways of using templates:

  • Native templating where you use foreach, if, with and other control bindings. The control flow bindings use the HTML markup in your element and render against your data. The feature is built into Knockout.
  • String-based templating connects Knockout to third-party template engine, such as jQuery Templates, MustacheJS, or underscore.

In this post, you will learn the basics of using templates in your HTML application using JavaScript.

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Object JavaScript – Dynamic UI With MVVM Using ObservableArray in Knockout.js

knockoutIn our previous post Dynamic UI Using Observables with MVVM Using Knockout.js, you learned how you get started with Knockout.js and how you can detect and respond to changes on one object using observables.

Knockout.js simplifies JavaScript UI by applying the Model-View-ViewModel pattern.

Now if you want to detect and respond to changes of a collection of things, you can use an observableArray. An observableArray tracks which objects are in the array, not the state of those objects.

An observableArray tracks which objects it holds, and notifies listeners when objects are added or removed.

You can make the items themselves observable if you wish, but we’ll start with a basic observableArray.

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Object JavaScript – Bindings With MVVM in Knockout.js

knockoutIn our previous post Dynamic UI Using Observables with MVVM Using Knockout.js, you learned how you get started with Knockout.js and how you can detect and respond to changes on one object using observables.

Knockout provides ways to bind the data you specify in the data-bind attribute to the element. You can apply bindings to the text and appearance, use them in the logic you use to display items, and working with form fields.

In addition, you can create your own custom bindings.

Let’s see how.

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Object JavaScript – Dynamic UI Using Observables with MVVM Using Knockout.js

knockoutIn our previous posts, you learned how to build modules. In the next series of posts, you will learn how you can connect up modules to the user interface. You will learn, step by step how to use observables for your user interface to dynamically update itself.

Knockout.js makes it easier to create rich, responsive UIs with JavaScript. Any time you have sections of UI that update dynamically (e.g., changing depending on the user’s actions or when an external data source changes), KO can help you implement it more simply and maintainable.

Knockout helps you build rich client-side interactivity by using an MVVM-like (Model, View, and ViewModel) pattern. It does this by helping you separate the UI behavior and the data structures. To do this, you will use declarative bindings with observable data.

Knockout is free, open source, and available for your projects using the MIT License.

Knockout helps you:

  • Synchronize JSON models with HTML elements using Observable Properties.
  • Synchronize arrays, using Observable Arrays.
  • Provide calculated properties using Computed Properties.

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